C. J. Cherryh – Cassandra (1978)

C. J. Cherryh‘s Hugo Award-winning short story Cassandra was first published by Fantasy and Science Fiction in October 1978. I listened to this on episode 307 of the StarShipSofa podcast.

Cassandra tells the story of a woman haunted by visions of the apocalypse.

Have you read it? What did you think? Let me know on Twitter @shortsfreview or by leaving a comment below.

You can subscribe to the Short Science Fiction Review on iTunes HERE.

 

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Jason Sanford – Death Flowers of Never Forgotten Love (2016)

Jason Sanford‘s short story Death Flowers of Never Forgotten Love was first published in issue 82 of Apex Magazine from March 2016.

Death Flowers of Never Forgotten Love tells the story of an AI installed into a human body grieving for the loss of her boyfriend.

Have you read this story? What did you think? Let me know on Twitter @ShortSFreview, or by leaving a comment below.

You can subscribe to the Short Science Fiction Review on iTunes HERE.

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Leah Bobet – Bliss (2004)

Leah Bobet‘s short story Bliss was first published in the winter 2004-05 issue of On Spec.

Bliss is an exploration around the themes of the meaning of addiction and the pursuit of happiness.

I read this story in the anthology Science Fiction: Best of the Year 2006, edited by Rich Horton.

Have you read it? What did you think?

Leave a comment below or get in touch on Twitter @shortSFreview.

You can subscribe to the Short Science Fiction Review on iTunes HERE.

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Rich Larson – Blindr (Beta 3.1) (2015)

Rich Larson‘s piece of flash fiction Blindr (Beta 3.1) was first published in issue two of The Singularity magazine in 2015.

Blindr (Beta 3.1) is about a person with an app that allows him to edit how he perceives reality.

Have you read this story? Let me know what you think on Twitter @shortsfreview, or by leaving a comment below.

You can subscribe to the Short Science Fiction Review on iTunes HERE.

 

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Eating

Grandma was delicious. It was probably the paprika that gave her that extra bite. Her funeral was boring, but once the vicar had finished telling us about a woman he’d never met, the eating was wonderful.

It’s a tradition in our family to specify a recipe as part of your will. I’ve opted for a rosemary crust and three-bean salad.

To share yourself with your neighbours and loved-ones brings everyone closer together. It’s nice.

It’s when things get impersonal that I start to feel a bit weird about it. Take today: I had a great conversation with my cousin while we were working on the marinade. The last time we’d spoken was at uncle Jeff’s eating. He went for the full-on cajun-spiced, flash-fry. He was probably terrible for you, but he was so tasty. It was a real treat.

There was a woman who lived near my mother who died. She had no children or relatives. She was isolated, very lonely. It was sad.

Once the pathologist was done bagging and tagging, and the coroner released the body, she was sent in small parcels to the food-banks around the city. I don’t have a problem with this per se, but there’s something lost. It shouldn’t just be about recycling.

It’s like when there was the fire at that nursery. You couldn’t tell one toddler from another, and no one really wants to be eating some stranger’s kid. So they were shipped off to feed prisoners. I get that this is a good thing. I’m probably just being a snob, but I just find it a bit creepy.

I found out recently that my great aunt Maude is dying, and she’s opted to be stir-fried in walnut oil with garlic, chilli and ginger. I hope she hurries up: I love Chinese food.

This text is copyright 2016 by Jon Cronshaw, released under a BY-NC-ND Creative Commons Licence.

Charlie Jane Anders – The Day it all Ended (2014)

Charlie Jane Anders‘s short story The Day it all Ended Was first published in the 2014 anthology Hieroglyph: Stories and Visions for a Better Future, edited by Ed Finn.

It tells the story of a disillusioned executive working for a design company that produces desirable, exoensive and seemingly pointless gadgets; but there is a twist…

This episode includes major spoilers, so I would highly recommend reading the story before listening.

Have you read this story? What did you think? Let me know by commenting below, or by sending me a tweet @shortSFreview.

You can subscribe to the Short Science Fiction Review on iTunes HERE.

 

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George R. R. Martin – The Way of Cross and Dragon (1979)

George R. R. Martin‘s short story The Way of Cross and Dragon was first published in the June 1979 issue of Omni magazine.

The Way of Cross and Dragon tells the story of a far-future inquisitor investigating a heresy which venerates Judas Iscariot. But things aren’t quite what they seem.

The story has been reprinted numerous times, I read it in the 1992 collection The Oxford Book of Science Fiction Stories, edited by Tom Shippey.

Have you read it? What did you make of the story? Let me know below in the comment section, or get in touch on Twitter @ShortSFreview.

You can subscribe to the Short Science Fiction Review on iTunes HERE.

 

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