33 Must-Read Sword and Sorcery Books for Adventure Seekers

Discover the history of sword and sorcery fantasy from pulp origins to modern revivals. Includes an essential reading list of 33 gritty, action-packed novels.

If you’re partial to a spot of swashbuckling, a dash of dark magic, and a generous helping of gritty heroism, then you’ve probably dipped your toes into the tempestuous seas of sword and sorcery.

You might even have a favourite battered paperback, its spine creased from countless re-reads, tucked away somewhere safe.

This genre of fantasy, oft-clad in a loincloth and waving a sizeable chunk of sharpened metal, has a storied history that’s as colourful as the characters it portrays.

But before we delve into the 33 essential reads, let’s journey back to the genre’s roots, shall we?

Buckle up for a whirlwind tour of testosterone, tarnished heroes, and timeless tales.

Pulp Fiction’s Barbaric Birth

Our tale begins in the rough-and-ready world of 1930s pulp magazines, where the gritty, often morally ambiguous world of sword and sorcery was first birthed.

The term itself was coined by Fritz Leiber, in response to a challenge from Michael Moorcock, another luminary of the genre.

But let’s not get ahead of ourselves, there’s plenty of blood to spill first.

Our first stop is the Hyborian Age, the playground of Robert E. Howard’s Conan the Barbarian.

With his rippling muscles, disdain for witchcraft, and tendency to solve problems with a broadsword, Conan embodied the genre’s defining characteristics. He was no knight in shining armour, more like a brigand in a blood-stained loincloth.

And readers loved him for it.

The pulp era was a veritable breeding ground for such characters. Amidst the lurid covers of magazines like ‘Weird Tales,’ they battled monsters, rescued (and occasionally abducted) maidens, and got up to all sorts of sword-swinging, sorcery-slaying shenanigans.

From Pulp to Paperback

The pulps may have birthed the genre, but it was the paperback revolution of the 1960s and 70s that really spread the seeds of sword and sorcery across the globe.

This was the era of Michael Moorcock’s Elric of Melniboné, a somewhat anaemic-looking bloke with a cursed sword that devoured souls.

Elric was the polar opposite of Conan—frail, introspective, and reliant on sorcery (and his soul-sucking sword) to survive.

He was a new type of hero for a new age, typifying the shift towards more morally complex characters.

Then, of course, there was Fritz Leiber’s Fafhrd and the Gray Mouser series.

These two roguish heroes, one a burly barbarian and the other a nimble thief, navigated a grimy, dangerous world full of dark magic and dangerous women.

It was a world where the monsters were often human, and the heroes were just trying to make a dishonest living.

The Modern Age of Grizzled Heroes

Fast forward to the present day, and sword and sorcery is still going strong, although perhaps it’s had a few pints, put on a bit of weight, and developed a slightly cynical outlook on life.

Modern authors have taken the genre’s foundations and built upon them, creating worlds that are darker, grittier, and dripping with even more gore.

Take Joe Abercrombie’s ‘The First Law’ series, a work of grimdark fiction as cheerful as a funeral in a rainstorm.

Its characters are deeply flawed, its world is cruel, and its magic is as likely to kill you as save you.

It’s sword and sorcery that’s been dragged through a hedge backwards, and it’s bloody brilliant.

Or consider Scott Lynch’s ‘The Lies of Locke Lamora.’

It’s a tale of thieves and con artists plying their trade in a city that makes the dens of the pulps look like a holiday resort.

It’s a world where the swords are sharp, the wit is sharper, and the sorcery…well, let’s just say you wouldn’t want to be on the wrong end of it.

Looking to the Future

Sword and sorcery has come a long way since the days of pulp magazines, but its heart remains the same.

It’s a genre that relishes in the raw, the rough, and the real.

It’s about heroes who aren’t always heroic, magic that’s as dangerous as it is powerful, and worlds where life is cheap and survival is an art.

It’s a dark, dangerous dance—a bloody ballet of blades and black magic.

And we wouldn’t have it any other way.

33 Recommended Sword and Sorcery Novels

If you’re looking for fantasy tales full of daring heroes, arcane magic, and thrilling adventures, sword and sorcery stories never fail to deliver action-packed escapism.

Here are 33 page-turning sword and sorcery novels everyone new to the genre should read:

Conan the Barbarian by Robert E. Howard

The iconic series that defined sword and sorcery featuring everyone’s favorite loincloth-wearing Cimmerian warrior.

Jirel of Joiry by C. L. Moore

Groundbreaking tales of the first female sword and sorcery heroine Jirel and her battles in a demon-haunted medieval France.

Servant of the Underworld by Aliette de Bodard

Sword and sorcery inspired by Aztec mythology with an engrossing mystery.

Throne of the Crescent Moon by Saladin Ahmed

Excellent sword and sorcery in a Middle Eastern inspired setting featuring a ghul hunter protecting the people.

The Amethyst Sword by Fleur Adcock

A lyrical and imaginative tale of warriors, wizardry and Celtic mythology.

Who Fears Death by Nnedi Okorafor

An original post-apocalyptic African sword and sorcery adventure.

The Copper Promise by Jen Williams

An action-packed epic following mercenaries, dragons, and ancient powers.

The Barbed Coil by J. V. Jones

A gritty tale of battle mages and political intrigue.

The Iron Dragon’s Daughter by Michael Swanwick

A subversive, contemporary take on sword and sorcery tropes.

The Cloud Roads by Martha Wells

Soaring dragon rider adventure perfect for fantasy fans.

The Fox Woman by A. Merritt

Classic Asian folklore inspired sword and sorcery.

Sister Light, Sister Dark by Jane Yolen

Celtic-flavoured sisterly conflicts amid mythical battles.

The Sword Woman by Robert E. Howard

Historical sword and sorcery set in the Dark Ages.

The Pit Dragon Trilogy by Jane Yolen

Young adult dragon rider adventure.

Daughter of the Empire by Raymond E. Feist

Political intrigue in a fantasy Asian-inspired setting.

Mirrorscape by Mike Wilks

A funhouse mirror world of swords and sorcery.

Alif the Unseen by G. Willow Wilson

A modern cyberpunk meets Arabian Nights tale.

The God Stalker Chronicles by P.C. Hodgell

Demon hunting swordswoman in an intricate world.

Throne of Glass by Sarah J. Maas

Action-packed YA blending epic fantasy and sword and sorcery.

Cloudbearer’s Shadow by J. Kathleen Cheney

Asian-inspired magic and dragons.

Redemption in Indigo by Karen Lord

A witty Caribbean storytelling vibe flavors this magical quest.

The Achtung Archipelago by Nick Mamatas

Subversive WWII alternate history mixed with sword and sorcery.

Starless by Jacqueline Carey

Epic journeys and demonic villains galore.

The Dragon’s Legacy by Deborah A. Wolf

Character-driven sword and sorcery with clan intrigue.

Throne of the Five Winds by S.C. Emmett

A unique Vietnamese fantasy world.

The Stone Knife by Anna Stephens

Grimdark sword and sorcery with imaginative worldbuilding.

The Mask of Mirrors by M.A. Carrick

Political intrigue mixed with gritty action.

Master of Poisons by Andrea Hairston

Majestic afrofuturist fantasy.

Empire of Sand by Tasha Suri

Indian-inspired tale of magics, dance, and destiny.

Black Leviathan by Bernd Perplies

Swashbuckling fantasy on the high seas.

Sorcerer to the Crown by Zen Cho

Magic and manners in Regency England with a dash of sword and sorcery.

The Tiger’s Daughter by K. Arsenault Rivera

Epic fantasy inspired by Mongolian history.

The Red Wolf Conspiracy by Robert V.S. Redick

Nautical fantasy adventure.

What are your favourites? Share your recommendations in the comments.

From Middle-Earth to Roshar: Tracing the Evolution of Epic Fantasy

Explore the evolution of epic fantasy from Tolkien’s foundational works to today’s expansive sagas, tracing key authors, series, tropes, and innovations that have shaped the growth of the beloved fantasy genre.

Today, we’ll embark on a journey through the annals of epic fantasy, traversing the vast landscapes of imagination.
From the legendary works of J.R.R. Tolkien to the sweeping sagas of Brandon Sanderson, we shall explore the evolution of this beloved genre.
So, grab your walking stick, saddle your trusty steed, and let us begin the adventure.

Standing on Tolkien’s shoulders

In the beginning, there was Tolkien. And Tolkien said, “Let there be Middle-earth!”
And lo, Middle-earth was born, replete with hobbits, elves, dwarves, and a fearsome Dark Lord.
Tolkien’s monumental work, The Lord of the Rings, set the stage for all the epic fantasy that would follow.
It was a tale of heroic deeds, grand quests, and a world so rich in detail, you’d think he’d been there himself.
But Tolkien’s mastery of world-building and language was not without its consequences.
For many years, the epic fantasy genre languished in his mighty shadow, with countless would-be wordsmiths attempting to recreate the magic of Middle-earth.
Some reached for the stars, while others, fell rather short of the mark.
But a new generation of authors emerged, each bringing their own unique flavour to the table.

The Wardrobe Opens with C.S. Lewis’ The Chronicles of Narnia

In the wake of Middle-earth’s creation by J.R.R. Tolkien, another towering figure in fantasy literature offered readers an invitation to a different kind of epic journey.
C.S. Lewis, a close friend and contemporary of Tolkien, crafted a world of magic and adventure accessible through an ordinary wardrobe in his iconic series, The Chronicles of Narnia.
While Tolkien endeavoured to craft an detailed, adult-oriented mythology, Lewis’ Narnia aimed to capture the imaginations of children.
The Chronicles of Narnia, beginning with “The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe,” introduced readers to a realm where animals talk, witches reign, and battles between good and evil are fought.
One of the distinguishing elements of Lewis’ series is the blend of Christian allegory with elements of Greek, Roman, and Norse mythologies, as well as traditional British and Irish fairy tales.
Aslan, the lion, is a figure of nobility and sacrifice, whose story arc draws heavily on Christian narratives, while other characters and plot elements borrow from a wide array of mythologies. This synthesis creates a world that is both familiar and fantastical, allowing for complex moral and philosophical explorations within an accessible, adventure-filled narrative.
The Chronicles of Narnia demonstrated that epic fantasy could be made accessible and enjoyable to younger readers while still engaging with complex themes and moral questions.

Envisioning the Far Future with Jack Vance’s The Dying Earth

Stretching the temporal dimensions of epic fantasy to their limits, Jack Vance’s The Dying Earth presents a richly detailed world set so far in the future that it teeters on the brink of entropy.
First published in 1950, this collection of loosely connected stories takes place in a time when the sun is nearing the end of its lifespan, casting a perpetual twilight upon an Earth populated by strange creatures and remnants of advanced, forgotten civilisations.
The Dying Earth features vivid world-building, characterised by a mix of fantasy and science fiction elements.
Vance’s far-future Earth is both a playground of advanced technology and a cradle of arcane magics, blurring the line between the two.
His prose is marked by a distinctive, ornate style that lends a sense of antiquity and melancholic beauty to the tales.
Inventive and filled with eccentric characters, Vance’s series was among the first to combine elements of science fiction and fantasy in a single narrative.
Its dystopian portrayal of a dying world and advanced society in decline introduced darker, more complex themes to the genre.
The series also stands out for its influence on magic systems in fantasy literature, with its concept of ‘memorised spells’ having been adapted by several subsequent works and role-playing games.
Jack Vance’s The Dying Earth represents an important milestone in the evolution of epic fantasy.
By envisioning a world so far removed from our present or historical past, Vance expanded the genre’s temporal boundaries and demonstrated the potential of blending speculative genres to create rich, unique worlds.
His influence can be felt in countless later works that blend magic and science, and in those that take place in far-flung futures.

Discovering The Wizard of Earthsea

Published in the late 1960s, Le Guin’s Earthsea Cycle was groundbreaking, blending elements of high fantasy, coming-of-age narrative, and philosophical exploration.
Set in the archipelago of Earthsea, the story follows Ged, a young boy with innate magical talent.
Le Guin’s Earthsea diverges from many fantasy realms by not focusing on grand battles and quests, but rather the inward journey of its protagonist.
Ged’s struggles with his own pride and fear provide a powerful exploration of self-discovery and personal growth.
Le Guin’s approach to magic is also worth noting. In Earthsea, magic is based on the idea of balance and understanding the true nature of things, primarily through their ‘true names’. This concept added a layer of depth and spirituality to the genre, reinforcing the idea that power comes with responsibility and often, personal cost.
The Wizard of Earthsea’s focus on personal growth and introspection, along with its nuanced treatment of magic, were key milestones in the evolution of epic fantasy.
Le Guin’s contribution showed that the genre was capable of tackling deep philosophical ideas and themes of personal identity, sowing seeds that would come to fruition in the works of future generations of fantasy authors.

Navigating Frank Herbert’s Dune

Frank Herbert’s Dune, while often categorised as science fiction, has had a profound influence on the epic fantasy genre.
Its detailed world-building, complex political machinations, and exploration of ecology and religion have resonated deeply within the realms of fantasy literature.
Dune unfolds on the desert planet Arrakis, the sole source of the universe’s most precious substance, the spice melange.
The tale follows young Paul Atreides, who navigates a deadly web of political intrigue and warfare as he comes to terms with his destiny.
Dune’s depth of world-building is striking. Herbert creates a universe rich in politics, religion, and ecology, detailing the interactions between various factions vying for control over the spice. This vastness and depth of world-building has become a hallmark of many epic fantasy narratives.
Furthermore, the narrative delves into philosophy and the human condition, exploring themes of power, religion, and ecological stewardship. This blending of speculative fiction with complex thematic exploration is a facet that Dune shares with epic fantasy.
Dune’s enduring legacy lies in its intricate narrative structure and the depths of its thematic exploration, which have become staples in the epic fantasy genre.
It is a benchmark in speculative fiction, illustrating the genre’s potential for depth and complexity. Dune’s influence in the realm of epic fantasy is undeniable, with its contributions helping to shape the genre into its current form.

Soaring with Anne McCaffrey’s Dragonflight

Anne McCaffrey’s Dragonflight, the first book in the Dragonriders of Pern series, is a groundbreaking work that blurs the lines between science fiction and fantasy, making a lasting impact on the landscape of epic fantasy.
Dragonflight introduces readers to the world of Pern, a colonised planet where the inhabitants have bio-engineered dragons to combat an alien spore, called Thread, that periodically rains down from the sky.
McCaffrey’s world is one where traditional fantasy elements, such as dragons and telepathy, meld with science fiction concepts, including space travel and genetic manipulation.
The narrative centres around Lessa, a young woman who forms a psychic bond with the dragon queen Ramoth, becoming a key player in Pern’s survival against the Thread.
McCaffrey’s use of a strong, complex female protagonist, a rarity in the genre at the time of the book’s publication, has had a lasting impact on epic fantasy, paving the way for increased gender diversity in the genre.
Dragonflight’s blend of science fiction and fantasy elements marked a departure from traditional epic fantasy tropes, expanding the genre’s boundaries. McCaffrey’s distinctive fusion of genres, combined with her focus on character-driven narrative, opened new avenues for thematic and narrative exploration within epic fantasy.

Unsheathing The Sword of Shannara

Making its debut in the mid-1970s, The Sword of Shannara by Terry Brooks played a pivotal role in the evolution of epic fantasy.
It stands as one of the first successful high fantasy novels published after the monumental works of Tolkien, proving to the publishing world that readers were eager for more epic fantasy tales.
Set in the Four Lands, a post-apocalyptic world brimming with magic, Brooks’ saga follows the half-elf Shea Ohmsford in his quest to wield the powerful Sword of Shannara against the malevolent Warlock Lord.
The world of Shannara showcases a richly diverse cast of races including dwarves, gnomes, and trolls, as well as a unique magical system.
While Brooks’ saga has drawn criticism for its perceived similarities to Tolkien’s work, it nevertheless helped to lay the foundation for modern epic fantasy.
His storytelling, filled with grand quests, magical artifacts, and diverse characters, helped establish key tropes of the genre.
The Sword of Shannara’s widespread popularity played a significant role in demonstrating the commercial viability of epic fantasy. This not only helped spawn a decades-long series of Shannara books but also paved the way for other epic fantasy authors.

Shattering Realities with Roger Zelazny’s Chronicles of Amber

In the 1970s, epic fantasy was given another twist, courtesy of Roger Zelazny’s Chronicles of Amber.
Zelazny’s work blurred the boundaries between fantasy and science fiction, weaving a tale of intra-dimensional politics and metaphysical exploration that was as philosophical as it was thrilling.
The Chronicles of Amber centre on Corwin, a member of the royal family of Amber, the one true world of which all others, including our Earth, are but mere shadows.
The concept of infinite parallel worlds, each a variation of Amber, offered an innovative take on world-building. Rather than crafting a single, detailed setting, Zelazny created a multiverse teeming with possibilities.
Zelazny’s Amber series features a sophisticated narrative, characterised by non-linear storytelling, unreliable narrators, and an elegant, allusive prose style that draws heavily from mythology and poetry.
His work, while replete with action and intrigue, also delves into philosophical and metaphysical themes, pushing the boundaries of what was traditionally expected from fantasy literature.
The Chronicles of Amber’s integration of fantasy, science fiction, and philosophical musings represented a significant shift in the genre, opening the door for later works that would further blur genre boundaries and deepen the thematic complexity of fantasy literature.

Embracing Complexity with Stephen Donaldson’s Thomas Covenant Series

In a daring departure from traditional heroics of epic fantasy, Stephen Donaldson introduced a profoundly flawed protagonist in his Chronicles of Thomas Covenant, the Unbeliever series.
Launched in 1977 with “Lord Foul’s Bane,” the series was revolutionary, as it grappled with complex psychological and ethical dilemmas through its eponymous character, Thomas Covenant.
Covenant is an antihero who is thrust into a magical realm known as The Land while suffering from a severe crisis of disbelief, exacerbated by his real-world diagnosis of leprosy. The series is marked by Covenant’s struggle to accept the reality of The Land, whilst grappling with his sense of morality and the burden of power.
Donaldson’s works are recognised for their exploration of the human condition, introspection, and the moral implications of power. They are characterised by their dense, literary style and philosophical underpinnings, offering a stark contrast to the straightforward heroism often found in the genre.
The series demonstrated that epic fantasy could delve deep into complex emotional and psychological landscapes. By focusing on an antihero, Donaldson underscored that fantasy characters could be deeply flawed and conflicted, opening the door for more nuanced character development in the genre.
The series challenged the notion of escapism often associated with fantasy literature, instead confronting readers with harsh realities and moral complexities. This move toward greater complexity and realism has significantly influenced subsequent authors, making the series a landmark in the evolution of epic fantasy.

Exploring Interdimensional Conflict

Adding a new dimension to epic fantasy, literally and figuratively, Raymond E. Feist’s Riftwar Saga begins with “Magician,” a novel that ushered readers into the twin worlds of Midkemia and Kelewan.
The saga, beginning in the early 1980s, brought a fresh take to the genre, blending traditional fantasy elements with ideas borrowed from science fiction, such as interdimensional travel and alien cultures.
Feist’s narrative focuses on an epic conflict, known as the Riftwar, between the inhabitants of Midkemia and Kelewan, brought on by a rift in space-time.
Over the course of the saga, readers are treated to intricate plotlines and a vast cast of characters, encompassing everything from humble apprentices to powerful sorcerers, from human thieves to alien invaders.
Feist’s work stands out for its fusion of epic and personal narratives.
While the Riftwar provides a backdrop of grandeur and spectacle, the saga’s heart lies in its focus on characters’ growth and relationships, lending a personal dimension to the interdimensional conflict.
Feist’s Riftwar Saga offered a unique blend of elements, taking the best of epic fantasy—grand scale, intricate world-building, a large cast of characters—and blending it with the alien worlds and interdimensional concepts more common in science fiction.
This cross-genre pollination, combined with the series’ emphasis on character development, played a substantial role in shaping the direction of modern epic fantasy.

Dungeons & Dragons

While our journey has primarily focused on literary works, it would be remiss not to acknowledge the influence of the iconic tabletop role-playing game, Dungeons & Dragons (D&D), on the evolution of epic fantasy.
Devised by Gary Gygax and Dave Arneson, D&D broke new ground in the world of gaming and storytelling, inviting players to step into the shoes of adventurers in a multitude of fantastical settings.
It established a framework of rules, races, classes, and magic systems that has since become synonymous with fantasy role-playing games.
The game encourages collaborative storytelling, as players navigate through adventures, or ‘campaigns,’ guided by a Dungeon Master.
This approach blends elements of improvisational theatre, narrative storytelling, and strategic gameplay into a singular experience.
In this way, D&D mirrors the richness of epic fantasy literature, offering characters, plots, and worlds that can be as complex and captivating as any novel.
D&D has not only inspired numerous fantasy authors but has also led to its own successful line of novels, such as the Dragonlance and Forgotten Realms series (more on those in a moment).
The game’s influence extends beyond the realm of literature and gaming, impacting broader pop culture and reinforcing the enduring appeal of the fantasy genre.
Dungeons & Dragons’ influence on the evolution of epic fantasy cannot be overstated. It has influenced countless authors, and spawned its own rich literary tradition, solidifying its place in the annals of epic fantasy.

Rolling the Dice with Dragonlance

The Dragonlance series, initiated by Margaret Weis and Tracy Hickman, holds a unique place in the evolution of epic fantasy.
Born out of Dungeons & Dragons game sessions, the series merged the realms of tabletop gaming and fantasy literature, introducing a new level of collaborative storytelling and character development to the genre.
Set in the world of Krynn, the Dragonlance series brought the high-stakes adventure and camaraderie of role-playing games to the page.
The initial Chronicles Trilogy starts with “Dragons of Autumn Twilight,” launching readers into a tale of friendship, treachery, and epic battles, populated with a diverse cast of characters, each with their own distinctive traits and arcs.
Dragonlance’s world-building is characterised by a blend of classic fantasy elements with original creations, such as the different types of dragons, the orders of knighthood, and the various races inhabiting Krynn. The pantheon of gods and the magic system in Dragonlance are also tied closely to the Dungeons & Dragons mechanics, creating a familiar landscape for fans of the game while extending the narrative possibilities.
The series’ emphasis on character relationships and development, its exploration of moral themes, and the infusion of humour and camaraderie set it apart.
The characters of Dragonlance, from the heroic Tanis Half-Elven to the enigmatic Raistlin Majere, resonate with readers, often because of their flaws and inner conflicts rather than their heroic deeds.
The Dragonlance series, with its roots in Dungeons & Dragons, not only transformed the epic fantasy landscape but also highlighted the potential for role-playing games to inspire engaging and complex narratives.

Into the Depths with Forgotten Realms

Another cornerstone in the realm of fantasy literature rooted in the fertile ground of Dungeons & Dragons is the Forgotten Realms series.
This franchise, with dozens of authors contributing over the years, has expanded into a vast literary universe that showcases the storytelling possibilities of shared-world settings.
The most iconic subset of the Forgotten Realms series is R.A. Salvatore’s books featuring the drow, or dark elf, Drizzt
Do’Urden. Drizzt, with his moral complexity, deep sense of honour, and struggle against his people’s cruel reputation, quickly captured readers’ imaginations, making him one of the most beloved characters in all of epic fantasy.
Set within the sprawling world of Faerûn, the Forgotten Realms stories encompass a broad range of settings and characters.
The vastness of this shared world allows authors to delve into a myriad of stories, from high-stakes epic quests to smaller, more personal narratives, all against a richly imagined backdrop.
The Forgotten Realms series, particularly through iconic characters like Drizzt Do’Urden, underscores the genre’s ability to delve into the internal conflicts of individuals as much as external epic quests, offering a nuanced perspective on heroism and morality within the larger context of a shared universe.

Unraveling the Pawn of Prophecy

Continuing the trend of epic fantasy in the 1980s, David Eddings’ The Belgariad series, beginning with Pawn of Prophecy, brought a refreshing character-centric approach to the genre.
Eddings constructed a richly detailed world filled with diverse cultures, a pantheon of gods, and prophecies that entwine fate and free will.
The Pawn of Prophecy introduces us to Garion, an unassuming farm boy, who is catapulted into an epic quest to fulfill a grand prophecy.
Eddings’ focus on character development and interactions, particularly in the banter among Garion’s traveling companions, set a new standard for character dynamics within the genre.
Eddings’ approach to magic is also notable. In his world, sorcery is rooted in the Will and the Word, where a person’s will, when voiced, can influence the world. This concept adds an intellectual aspect to his magic system, tying it closely with the characters’ emotional states and mental discipline.
The Belgariad series, with its blend of rich world-building, engaging characters, and thought-provoking prophecies, has made a lasting impact on epic fantasy, with several modern author citing at as the series that made them want to write their own epic fantasy.
David Eddings demonstrated that at the heart of epic fantasy can be deeply human stories, where the characters and their relationships can be as compelling as the grandest of quests.

Unfolding Gene Wolfe’s The Book of the New Sun

Gene Wolfe’s The Book of the New Sun, a four-volume science fantasy epic, marks a significant departure from conventional epic fantasy narratives.
Its fusion of science fiction and fantasy, coupled with a complex, layered narrative, has profoundly influenced the genre.
The series is set in a far future Earth, now referred to as Urth, a dying world governed by a decaying society that has forgotten its technologically advanced past.
The narrative is presented as a memoir of Severian, a journeyman torturer who is exiled for the crime of showing mercy.
Wolfe’s work challenges the conventions of the genre, not just through its setting and narrative structure, but also through its complex use of language and its exploration of philosophical and theological themes.
The narrative is rife with allusions, allegory, and symbolism, which add multiple layers of meaning, making each rereading a new experience.
The Book of the New Sun also stands out for its unreliable narrator, Severian, whose flawed recollections add another layer of complexity to the narrative. This technique has influenced many contemporary fantasy authors, showcasing the narrative potential that lies in the unreliable perspective.
The Book of the New Sun is a landmark in the evolution of epic fantasy, broadening the genre’s thematic and narrative horizons.

Entering The Dark Tower: The Gunslinger

When you think of Stephen King, the genre that first comes to mind is likely horror, not epic fantasy.
Yet with The Dark Tower series, starting with The Gunslinger, King successfully merges these genres, producing a unique blend of epic fantasy, horror, western, and science fiction elements that defies easy categorization.
The series follows the journey of Roland Deschain, the last Gunslinger, in his relentless pursuit of the enigmatic Man in Black and the quest for the Dark Tower.
The Dark Tower itself, the nexus of all universes, is a compelling symbol of the intersection between order, chaos, and the protagonist’s obsession.
King’s complex narrative blends the mundane with the fantastical, intertwining parallel worlds, multiple timelines, and a medley of characters each uniquely flawed yet endearing.
The inclusion of elements from his other novels lends an additional layer of complexity to the series, effectively turning it into a meta-textual journey through King’s literary universe.
With The Gunslinger, King successfully integrated elements of American Westerns—the lone gunslinger, the arid desert, the pursuit of a formidable enemy—into the epic fantasy genre, presenting readers with a unique take on the hero’s journey.
The Dark Tower series demonstrates the flexibility of epic fantasy, highlighting its potential to borrow from and blend with other genres, further expanding its imaginative boundaries.

The Colourful Chaos of Discworld

Meanwhile, Terry Pratchett was busy turning the epic fantasy genre on its head with his satirical and whimsical Discworld series.
Set on a flat world balanced on the backs of four elephants riding a gigantic turtle swimming through space, Discworld is a testament to the limitless bounds of the genre.
Pratchett’s work played with tropes and clichés, using humour, satire, and wit to present deep philosophical and social commentaries.
The diversity of his characters, from sentient luggage to witches and city watchmen, created a universe as colourful and chaotic as our own.
By not taking itself too seriously, Discworld opened up a new path for the genre, one that allowed for laughter and profundity in equal measure.
Pratchett’s contribution demonstrated that epic fantasy could be light-hearted yet thoughtful, pushing the boundaries of the genre in unexpected and delightful ways.

Returning to Roots with Tad Williams’ Memory, Sorrow, and Thorn Trilogy

As epic fantasy continued to evolve, Tad Williams’ Memory, Sorrow, and Thorn trilogy returned to the genre’s roots while simultaneously pushing it towards new horizons.
Launched with “The Dragonbone Chair,” the trilogy is lauded for its revival of traditional fantasy motifs, skillfully reimagined within a complex narrative and thematic framework.
Set in the realm of Osten Ard, Williams’ series explores the fallout of a historic war between humans and the immortal Sithi.
The trilogy centres around Simon, a young kitchen boy, who is catapulted into an epic quest replete with magic swords, ancient prophecies, and warring factions.
While Memory, Sorrow, and Thorn employs traditional epic fantasy tropes, Williams breathes new life into these conventions.
His characters are complex and well-drawn, with Simon’s journey from kitchen boy to hero unfolding in a realistic and compelling manner.
Williams also delves into the complexities of power, history, and memory, infusing the series with a depth that transcends typical fantasy narratives.
Perhaps the most lasting impact of Memory, Sorrow, and Thorn, however, has been its influence on subsequent fantasy authors.
George R.R. Martin, in particular, has cited the trilogy as an inspiration for his A Song of Ice and Fire series, praising Williams for showing that epic fantasy could offer both the wonder of the imaginary and the dissection of human nature.

Spinning Robert Jordan’s Wheel of Time

Robert Jordan’s Wheel of Time series is a cornerstone in the landscape of epic fantasy, known for its enormous scope and intricate detail.
Comprising 14 books, it is a sprawling saga set in a world that might be a far-future Earth, reshaping the genre with its depth and complexity.
The series explores the cyclical nature of time through its protagonist, Rand al’Thor, the reincarnation of a powerful figure destined to fight the Dark One.
Jordan’s work stands out for its enormous cast of characters, each contributing to the elaborate tapestry of a world teetering on the brink of chaos.
The magic system in the Wheel of Time, based on the male-female duality of the True Source, is a masterful blend of eastern philosophy and western mysticism.
This gender-based magic system contributes to the series’ exploration of gender dynamics, lending an interesting dimension to the narrative.
Jordan’s world-building is astonishingly detailed. His societies are steeply stratified and feature distinct cultures, languages, and histories, making the world feel incredibly real and lived-in.
He also masterfully interweaves political maneuvering, large-scale battles, and deeply personal character arcs, creating a rich, textured narrative. It is a testament to the genre’s capacity for grandeur and depth.

Exploring Historical Reflections

Known for his meticulous and evocative historical fantasy, Guy Gavriel Kay took a poetic leap with “A Song for Arbonne”.
Published in 1992, the novel is set in a world inspired by the rich culture and turbulent history of the medieval Occitan region, now modern-day southern France.
“A Song for Arbonne” offers readers a world of courtly love, bitter rivalries, and intricate political machinations, a backdrop against which Kay explores themes of love, honour, and the brutal cost of war.
His characters, from the honour-bound Blaise to the fiercely independent troubadour, Lisseut, are drawn with a level of depth and complexity that elevates them beyond mere reflections of their historical counterparts.
Kay’s approach to historical fantasy is unique in the way he infuses his world-building with a strong sense of real-world history.
While he reimagines historical events and cultures, he does so with such finesse and depth of understanding that the resulting world feels as vibrant and real as any true historical setting.
“A Song for Arbonne” is a prime example of how historical fiction and epic fantasy can meld together, creating a subgenre that offers the best of both worlds.
The novel stands as a testament to Kay’s skill as a storyteller, demonstrating the potential of epic fantasy to delve deep into human history and experience. This work has undeniably influenced future authors who weave historical tapestries into their fantastical worlds.

Braving Westeros

A Song of Ice and Fire by George R.R. Martin has indisputably reshaped the landscape of epic fantasy.
Set in the continents of Westeros and Essos, the series is best known for its intricate character webs, political intrigue, and a disregard for protecting its key characters.
The narrative, told from multiple points of view, explores the power struggles among noble houses vying for the Iron Throne.
This multi-perspective storytelling gives readers a comprehensive look into the complex, often morally ambiguous world Martin has created.
His characters, whether heroes or villains, are deeply flawed and multifaceted, challenging the traditional binaries of good and evil found in many epic fantasies.
Martin’s world-building is meticulous. From the harsh winters of the North to the sprawling desert lands of Dorne, every setting is imbued with a distinctive culture, politics, and history.
The series’ nuanced exploration of power, war, and societal structures sets it apart, making it a pioneer in ‘grimdark’ fantasy.
However, Martin’s most significant contribution is arguably his willingness to subvert reader expectations by killing off key characters.
This disregard for narrative safety adds a level of unpredictability, creating a palpable sense of danger and tension throughout the series.

Through the Eyes of the Farseer

Following this period of increasingly expansive and intricate world-building, a new chapter in the evolution of epic fantasy was heralded by the arrival of Robin Hobb and her Farseer Trilogy.
Hobb took a different approach, bringing the reader down from the soaring heights of cosmic struggle and grandeur to focus on a single character’s perspective—FitzChivalry Farseer, a royal bastard trained as an assassin.
Hobb’s mastery of character development and emotional depth added a new dimension to the genre.
Her world-building, while no less rich or detailed, was presented more subtly, woven into the very fabric of Fitz’s life and experiences.
She also introduced a unique magic system, where abilities range from animal telepathy (the Wit) to empathetic manipulation (the Skill).
She showed that epic fantasy need not be all about grand conflicts and large casts, but can also be deeply personal and emotional, delivering epic scope through the lens of a single character’s experience.

Unveiling the Malazan Enigma

In the evolution of epic fantasy, Steven Erikson’s formidable Malazan Book of the Fallen series stands out.
Erikson plunged readers into the deep end of a labyrinthine world, mirroring the complexity of real-life archaeology and anthropology.
Spanning continents, timeframes, and dimensions, Erikson’s ten-volume epic navigates through a vast sea of races, ancient history, a uniquely intricate magic system called ‘Warrens’, and an array of gods who meddle in mortal affairs.
But the grandeur of the Malazan world does not overshadow its exploration of philosophical and human themes.
Erikson digs deep into topics like compassion, mortality, and the cyclic nature of history, using the Malazan universe as his canvas. His approach to storytelling, a jigsaw of perspectives and non-linear narratives, offers a multifaceted exploration of these themes.
The Malazan Book of the Fallen, with its dense complexity and intellectual depth, stretched the boundaries of epic fantasy.
It proved that the genre can engage the intellect while providing entertainment, and redefined expectations for world-building and narrative depth.

Exploring Parallel Worlds in Philip Pullman’s His Dark Materials

Philip Pullman’s His Dark Materials trilogy, beginning with “Northern Lights,” introduced a level of philosophical and theological depth to epic fantasy that was groundbreaking at the time of its publication.
Set across parallel universes, including one resembling our own, the series follows Lyra Belacqua and Will Parry as they navigate complex universes teeming with witches, armoured bears, and daemons—external representations of a person’s inner self.
What sets His Dark Materials apart is its ambitious tackling of profound philosophical and theological questions.
The series deftly explores themes of free will, the nature of consciousness, and the criticism of organised religion.
This thematic richness, combined with Pullman’s brilliant storytelling, brings an intellectual heft to the genre.
Pullman’s creation of daemons—external manifestations of a person’s soul in the form of animal companions—is a unique contribution to epic fantasy, providing a strikingly original mechanism to explore characters’ inner lives.
Furthermore, the series’ protagonist, Lyra, is a complex and engaging female character whose narrative is not defined by a romantic storyline, a relative rarity in the genre. Pullman’s focus on a strong, independent young female lead has had a lasting impact on epic fantasy, paving the way for more such empowering characters.

Flying High with Eragon

Christopher Paolini’s Eragon, the inaugural novel in the Inheritance Cycle, brought a youthful perspective to the epic fantasy genre.
Written when Paolini was just a teenager, the series resonated with a younger audience, carving out a place for adolescent voices in the realm of epic fantasy.
Set in the world of Alagaësia, Eragon follows the journey of its titular character, a young farm boy, whose life takes an adventurous turn when he discovers a mysterious blue stone that turns out to be a dragon egg.
The story combines classic elements of epic fantasy, such as dragons, magic, and a grand quest, with a coming-of-age narrative that speaks directly to younger readers.
The world-building in Eragon is expansive and immersive, featuring a host of races, languages, and cultures.
Despite its traditional epic fantasy backdrop, the series manages to deliver a fresh take by focusing on the protagonist’s personal growth and the moral complexities he grapples with as he navigates his journey.
Perhaps the most significant contribution of Eragon to the evolution of epic fantasy lies in its appeal to a younger audience. Paolini’s series helped to bridge the gap between children’s fantasy and adult epic fantasy, thereby expanding the readership of the genre.

Uncovering The Lies of Locke Lamora

, the first book in the Gentleman Bastard series, is a high-octane adventure that blends elements of epic fantasy with crime caper.
This novel shines a light on the seedier side of fantasy, providing a refreshing contrast to stories of royal lineage and world-saving quests.
The narrative introduces Locke Lamora, an orphan turned con artist leading a band of thieves known as the ‘Gentleman Bastards.’
In the city-state of Camorr, a place with Venetian-like canals and Elderglass towers, they execute elaborate scams targeting the city’s rich nobility.
Lynch’s world-building is rich and immersive, portraying Camorr as a city teeming with political intrigue, gang warfare, and ancient secrets.
The magic, while not as prevalent as in other fantasy novels, lurks in the background, adding an air of mystery and menace.
What truly sets this novel apart is its focus on clever, high-stakes cons, and the deep camaraderie among the ‘Gentleman Bastards.’
Lynch presents an intriguing and gritty look at the lives of thieves, highlighting their ingenuity and resilience in a world filled with danger.

Unraveling Patrick Rothfuss’s Kingkiller Chronicles

Patrick Rothfuss’s Kingkiller Chronicles, beginning with “The Name of the Wind,” signify a distinctive approach to epic fantasy, combining traditional tropes with a deep dive into the psyche of its protagonist, Kvothe.
The series unravels as a first-person narrative, with an older Kvothe recounting his life story to the Chronicler over three days. This framework lends a uniquely introspective slant to the narrative, delving into the character’s motivations, feelings, and innermost thoughts in a manner seldom seen in epic fantasy.
Rothfuss’s world-building is both comprehensive and captivating, encompassing a magic system rooted in scientific principles, an array of diverse cultures, and a richly detailed history. The inclusion of songs, poems, and stories within the larger narrative creates a deeply immersive world, harking back to the oral tradition of storytelling.
However, the series distinguishes itself through its focus on the personal journey of Kvothe.
While most epic fantasies revolve around large-scale events and their implications, the Kingkiller Chronicles zeroes in on Kvothe’s life, from his days as a troupe performer to his time at the University stud/headying magic.
This character-driven narrative creates a powerful sense of intimacy, making Kvothe’s triumphs and tribulations profoundly relatable.

Stepping into The Way of Shadows

Brent Weeks’ The Way of Shadows, the first installment in the Night Angel trilogy, is an exhilarating foray into the dark underbelly of a world where assassins, or “wetboys,” wield magic.
The novel features a high-stakes tale of survival and transformation, delving into themes of power, sacrifice, and the moral complexities of vengeance.
The protagonist, Azoth, is a guild rat, struggling for survival in the slums, who apprentices himself to Durzo Blint, the realm’s most feared assassin.
His transformation into Kylar Stern, a professional killer, challenges the narrative conventions of the hero’s journey, exploring the harsh realities and moral ambiguities that come with his profession.
Weeks’ world-building is striking in its grit and complexity, with a magical system that is both mystical and cruel. The magic, termed Talent, is intertwined with the profession of wetboys, who employ it not just for killing, but also for stealth, healing, and even immortality.
The Way of Shadows blends elements of epic fantasy with a dark, almost noir-like atmosphere, resulting in a distinctly grim and captivating narrative.
Its focus on a morally gray protagonist, intricate magic system, and the exploration of sacrifice and survival broadens the horizons of epic fantasy.
Weeks’ series signifies the genre’s capacity for darkness and introspection, and the continuing exploration of its ethical boundaries.

Reframing Morality with Joe Abercrombie’s First Law Trilogy

Entering the scene in the mid-2000s, Joe Abercrombie’s First Law Trilogy cast a gritty, grey-tinted lens on the epic fantasy genre.
Known for its grim realism, moral ambiguity, and raw characterisation, Abercrombie’s series marked a significant departure from the genre’s traditional ‘good versus evil’ narrative.
The series, beginning with “The Blade Itself,” introduces us to a range of deeply flawed, complex characters, from a barbarian warrior to a crippled torturer.
Abercrombie’s world is not one of clear-cut heroes and villains but a murky realm where characters wrestle with their own vices, prejudices, and questionable morality.
Abercrombie’s works stand out for their harsh realism and biting wit.
He handles violence with unflinching honesty, emphasising its brutality and consequences.
His knack for subverting tropes and expectations has made the First Law Trilogy a standard-bearer for the ‘grimdark’ subgenre of fantasy.

Facing the Darkness with Peter V. Brett’s Demon Cycle

In a world where nightfall brings fear and the ever-present threat of demonic attack, Peter V. Brett’s Demon Cycle unfolds.
Starting with “The Warded Man” in 2008, the series melds the traditional fantasy premise of good versus evil with a nuanced examination of human nature and societal dynamics.
Brett’s world is one besieged by demons, known as corelings, rising from the earth’s core each night.
The only defence against these creatures are the protective wards, ancient symbols of power, which the inhabitants of this world use to shield their homes. This daily fight for survival creates a tense and relentless atmosphere that permeates the entire series.
Central to the Demon Cycle’s narrative is the journey of its characters, from fearful survivors to heroes. However, Brett adds depth by highlighting the societal changes and conflicts that emerge as these characters wield their newfound power, raising questions about leadership, responsibility, and the cost of survival.
The Demon Cycle is a significant contribution to the epic fantasy genre for its fusion of traditional fantasy tropes with intense survival drama and sociopolitical commentary.
The series demonstrates how the boundaries of epic fantasy can be expanded without sacrificing its core themes of heroism and conflict.

Exploring A Darker Shade of Magic

V.E. Schwab’s A Darker Shade of Magic, the inaugural book in the Shades of Magic series, is an exhilarating dive into parallel Londons, each with its own distinct relationship with magic.
Schwab’s novel masterfully blends elements of epic fantasy, parallel universes, and adventure, adding a splash of vibrant colour to the genre.
The story revolves around Kell, an Antari magician who can travel between four different Londons—Red, Grey, White, and the forbidden Black London. Each of these worlds is strikingly unique, varying in their level of magical saturation and societal structures, and is brought to life through Schwab’s immersive world-building.
Schwab introduces a compelling magic system, where magic is seen not just as a tool but as a living entity with its own will.
The relationship between the characters and magic is intrinsically tied to the world they inhabit, forming a crucial part of the narrative’s tension and intrigue.
Also noteworthy is Delilah Bard, a cunning thief from Grey London, who aspires to be a pirate. Schwab deftly subverts the damsel-in-distress trope with Delilah, who is driven by her ambition and thirst for adventure.
A Darker Shade of Magic is an excellent representation of the innovative potential in epic fantasy and showcases the vast, multi-dimensional landscape that epic fantasy literature has evolved to inhabit.

Diving into Six of Crows

Leigh Bardugo’s Six of Crows, the first in a duology, blends the thrilling heist elements of crime fiction with the immersive world-building of epic fantasy, creating a unique narrative that broadens the genre’s scope.
Set in the gritty, bustling city of Ketterdam, a hub for international trade and criminal activity, the story revolves around Kaz Brekker and his crew of skilled outcasts. These misfits are tasked with a near-impossible heist: breaking into the impenetrable Ice Court to retrieve a prisoner with invaluable knowledge.
Bardugo’s world-building is rich and intricate, extending the Grishaverse established in her earlier trilogy. She uses the heist as a narrative device to explore the socio-economic dynamics, racial disparities, and political machinations in this morally grey world.
The novel stands out for its well-drawn ensemble cast, each with a complex backstory and personal motivations that drive the narrative.
They bring diversity to the genre, not just in terms of their varied backgrounds, but also through the exploration of themes such as trauma, addiction, and identity.
Six of Crows is a testament to the genre’s ability to evolve beyond conventional fantasy tropes and settings. Bardugo skillfully intertwines elements of crime and epic fantasy, crafting a narrative centered around a high-stakes heist while exploring themes of friendship, loyalty, and survival.

Sailing with The Grace of Kings

Ken Liu’s The Grace of Kings, the first in the Dandelion Dynasty series, signals a significant shift in the epic fantasy genre towards a more diverse and globally inspired narrative.
Drawing on elements from Chinese history and mythology, Liu crafts an epic tale of rebellion, friendship, and the transformative power of stories.
The story takes place in the islands of Dara, where two unlikely friends, the bandit Kuni Garu and the defiant nobleman Mata Zyndu, rise against the tyranny of the emperor. Their friendship, tested by the tumult of rebellion and their differing ideologies, forms the emotional core of the narrative.
Liu’s world-building is elaborate and distinctly Eastern in flavour, a divergence from the predominantly Eurocentric settings in epic fantasy.
He infuses the narrative with elements of Chinese philosophy, mythological creatures, and a unique system of airships and battle kites.
Liu’s innovative blend of epic fantasy with elements of wuxia, silkpunk, and Chinese history exemplifies the potential for cultural diversity within the genre.

Unleashing The Fifth Season

Marking a shift in the tectonic plates of epic fantasy, N.K. Jemisin’s groundbreaking The Fifth Season redefined what the genre could encompass.
Set in a dystopian world, The Stillness, plagued by catastrophic climate changes known as ‘Seasons’, Jemisin weaves a story of survival, oppression, and the power of the earth itself.
Jemisin’s innovative narrative structure, employing second-person point of view and non-linear storytelling, challenged traditional storytelling conventions, lending a distinctive voice to the genre.
She breathed life into her characters and magic system, where ‘orogenes’ can control seismic activity, adding new layers to the world-building palette of epic fantasy.
Jemisin uses the plight of the orogenes to explore themes of systemic oppression and racism, embedding these discussions naturally within her world.
Her nuanced treatment of these subjects is both challenging and thought-provoking, ensuring her work resonates beyond the realm of fiction.
The Fifth Season, with its fusion of sociopolitical themes and inventive storytelling, solidified Jemisin’s place as a transformative force in epic fantasy.

Igniting the Powder Mage Revolution

Brian McClellan’s Powder Mage trilogy ignited a fresh spark in the world of epic fantasy with its innovative blend of traditional magic and historical elements, forming a genre sometimes referred to as ‘flintlock fantasy.’
McClellan constructs a unique world that resembles 18th-century Europe in the throes of revolutionary fervor, yet suffused with magic, where the smell of gunpowder is as familiar as the scent of blood.
The story revolves around a diverse group of characters caught up in political upheaval and civil war, including the titular ‘Powder Mages.’
These are individuals who can manipulate gunpowder to explosive effect, and even ingest it to enhance their physical abilities. This inventive magic system, juxtaposed with the series’ more conventional ‘Privileged’ sorcerers, establishes a tense dynamic that reflects the broader class struggle within McClellan’s world.
The Powder Mage series offers a distinctive twist on epic fantasy, merging elements of historical and military fiction with traditional fantasy tropes.
McClellan’s emphasis on military strategy, political intrigue, and battlefield tactics, combined with his gritty, unvarnished portrayal of war, adds a layer of realism that grounds the fantastical elements of the story.
Through the Powder Mage trilogy, McClellan demonstrates that epic fantasy can successfully incorporate and reimagine elements from other genres. His unique blend of magic, history, and politics not only expands the genre’s boundaries but also highlights the creative potential of epic fantasy, contributing to its ongoing evolution.

The Onset of The Poppy War

Navigating a fresh course in the sea of epic fantasy, R.F. Kuang’s The Poppy War offers a gripping, ruthless perspective on war and its costs.
Drawing inspiration from the tumultuous history of 20th century China, including the Second Sino-Japanese War and the Opium Wars, Kuang masterfully interweaves real historical events with fantastical elements, offering a rich, immersive backdrop for her tale.
The story follows Rin, a war orphan who escalates from obscurity to power through sheer determination and grit, but soon finds herself embroiled in the brutality of war and divine politics.
Rin’s journey is not one of heroism in the traditional sense—instead, it’s a harrowing examination of the devastating effects of war and the corrosive influence of power.
Kuang’s depiction of magic is tied intrinsically with gods and the price one must pay for their help. This links the fantastical with the horrific realities of war, and serves as a metaphor for the destructive power of weapons and the ethical dilemmas inherent in their use.
The Poppy War is a stark departure from many of its epic fantasy contemporaries. Its unflinching portrayal of war’s horrors and its engagement with themes of colonialism, racism, and power dynamics present a challenging, thought-provoking narrative.
Kuang’s work underscores the capacity of epic fantasy to grapple with grim historical realities and complex moral issues, further broadening the genre’s horizons.

The Unfolding of The Green Bone Saga

Fonda Lee’s Green Bone Saga, beginning with “Jade City”, offers a unique hybrid of epic fantasy and crime thriller, set in a world reminiscent of 20th-century Asia.
Lee’s trilogy deftly mixes martial arts, organised crime, and magic into a narrative that challenges traditional definitions of epic fantasy.
Centred on the island of Kekon, the story is grounded in the power of jade, a substance that bestows superhuman abilities upon its wearers.
The societal and economic implications of jade form the heart of the narrative, with rival clans vying for control over its trade.
Lee’s portrayal of jade as both a source of power and a potential curse mirrors the double-edged nature of wealth and ambition in real-world societies.
Character dynamics in the Green Bone Saga are deeply entwined with family loyalty and clan politics. The protagonists, members of the Kaul family, must navigate treacherous political waters while dealing with their own interpersonal struggles and the moral complexities of their actions.
With the Green Bone Saga, Lee effectively fuses elements of gangster drama with epic fantasy, creating a world that feels lived-in and authentic.

Exploring New Horizons with Black Leopard, Red Wolf

Marlon James’ Black Leopard, Red Wolf, the first installment in the Dark Star Trilogy, signifies a powerful emergence of Afrofuturism in the realm of epic fantasy.
With a narrative that interweaves African history, mythology, and James’ potent imagination, the novel challenges conventional fantasy tropes and brings in a fresh, non-Western perspective.
The novel’s protagonist is Tracker, a man with a keen sense of smell, who’s hired to find a missing boy. Accompanied by a diverse cast of characters including a shape-shifting man-leopard, he traverses ancient cities, dense forests, and treacherous kingdoms on his quest.
James’ world-building is both immersive and expansive, drawing heavily from African folklore and mythology. This rich cultural tapestry gives rise to a fantastical realm filled with unforgettable creatures, mystical landscapes, and deeply entrenched power struggles.
But it’s not just the African-inspired setting that distinguishes the novel. Black Leopard, Red Wolf is an exploration of truth and power, of love and loss, and the destructive and redemptive aspects of humanity.
With Black Leopard, Red Wolf, Marlon James redefines the boundaries of epic fantasy, bringing in the richness and diversity of African culture.
His complex narrative, combined with an innovative approach to storytelling, contributes significantly to the evolution of the genre, making it more inclusive and globally representative.

Riding the Indie Wave with Michael J. Sullivan’s Riyria Revelations

As the publishing landscape expanded and evolved, so too did the paths available to authors in the epic fantasy genre. One such trailblazer is Michael J. Sullivan, whose Riyria Revelations series emerged as a leading light in the independent publishing sector.
Riyria Revelations, which begins with “Theft of Swords,” combines traditional epic fantasy tropes with a buddy-cop dynamic, as it follows the adventures of the skilled thief Royce Melborn and his mercenary partner Hadrian Blackwater.
Sullivan’s journey to publication is particularly noteworthy. Initially rejected by corporate publishers, Sullivan decided to self-publish his work.
His series quickly gained a devoted following for its unique blend of high fantasy, humour, and heartl, illustrating the possibilities for independent authors in the modern publishing landscape.
The rise of self-publishing and independent authors like Sullivan has significantly broadened the epic fantasy genre. It allows for greater diversity in storytelling, as authors who might not fit the traditional publishing mold, or whose stories are deemed too risky or niche, can now reach their audience directly. This freedom has led to a flourishing of new voices and narratives, enriching the genre in countless ways.
Sullivan’s Riyria Revelations not only demonstrates the compelling storytelling of indie authors, but it also serves as an important reminder of the evolving pathways to publication in the genre.
Indie publishing continues to reshape the epic fantasy landscape, offering both authors and readers alike a wider array of narratives to explore and enjoy.

Allomancy and Highstorms: A New Giant Emerges

It’s fair to say we find ourselves in the age of Brandon Sanderson.
A veritable powerhouse of the genre, Sanderson has crafted works of staggering scope and imagination.
Sanderson’s Mistborn series is a key development in the epic fantasy genre, recognised for its innovative magic system, intricate plotting, and complex character development.
The series, beginning with “The Final Empire,” is set in a world where the prophesied hero has failed, and a tyrant known as the Lord Ruler has established a reign of terror.
Sanderson’s narrative turns the typical fantasy trope of the ‘chosen one’ on its head, offering a fresh perspective on the epic quest narrative.
However, the series’ standout feature is Sanderson’s intricate magic system.
Allomancy, the main magical system in Mistborn, is based on metals, where ‘Mistings’ can ingest and ‘burn’ a single type of metal to gain specific abilities, while ‘Mistborn’ can use all. This highly structured, almost scientific approach to magic has been influential in the genre, prompting other authors to rethink magic as a system with its own laws and limitations.
His characters are multi-dimensional, each with their own flaws, strengths, and motivations.
The narrative weaves multiple plot threads together, building towards an intricate, well-executed conclusion that pays off the series’ various narrative strands.
Following the Mistborn series, Sanderson embarked on an even more ambitious project, The Stormlight Archive.
Roshar is a world beset by fierce storms, and its flora and fauna have evolved to survive in these harsh conditions. This unique setting lends itself to some of the most original world-building in the genre.
Sanderson creates complex societies, intricate political structures, and detailed histories that enrich the reader’s experience of Roshar.
Sanderson introduces several magic systems in The Stormlight Archive, including Surgebinding and Shardbearing, each with their own distinct rules and limitations. This approach further showcases Sanderson’s ability to innovate within the epic fantasy genre, taking the idea of structured magic systems to new heights.
The series also features a diverse ensemble of characters, each with their own narrative arc, contributing to a multi-layered, complex story.
Characters grapple with issues of morality, duty, and identity, lending a depth and realism to the epic narrative.
The Stormlight Archive, with its exceptional world-building, multiple magic systems, and complex character arcs, represents a high point in the evolution of epic fantasy.
By weaving together these elements in a grand narrative, Sanderson demonstrates the genre’s potential to explore complex themes and ideas while captivating readers with rich, imaginative worlds.
His Stormlight Archive series, still in progress, is emblematic of the ongoing evolution of epic fantasy.
As the genre continues to grow and change, so too do the expectations of its readers.
Gone are the days when a simple tale of good vs. evil could suffice; now, readers demand intricate plots, morally ambiguous characters, and worlds so vast and detailed, they could be charted by a cartographer.

Embracing the Future of Epic Fantasy

And, so, we have arrived at the present day, with epic fantasy more diverse and imaginative than ever before. From Tolkien’s foundational work to Sanderson’s groundbreaking sagas, the genre has grown by leaps and bounds, enchanting readers the world over. It is a testament to the power of human imagination and the enduring appeal of a good story. As we stand on the precipice of uncharted literary territory, one thing is certain—the future of epic fantasy is as bright and boundless as it has ever been. And so,let us raise our goblets in a toast to the tales that have come before, and to those yet to be told. Cheers!  

Your First Steps into the Gritty World of Grimdark Fantasy: Top 33 Books

Dive into the grim and gritty world of Grimdark Fantasy with our beginner’s guide. Uncover 33 essential reads that define this subgenre, featuring antiheroes, complex plots, and dark realities.

Welcome to the dark, brooding underworld of fantasy literature—the Grimdark genre.

If you fancy stories where the sunlight rarely breaks through the clouds and your heroes are just villains who’ve had a worse day, then you’ve come to the right place.

 This handy beginner’s guide to grimdark fantasy will help you navigate these shadowy realms like a pro.

Defining Grimdark: It’s Not All Unicorns and Rainbows

Unlike your usual fantasy fare where knights in shining armour gallantly rescue innocent princesses from fire-breathing dragons, grimdark doesn’t pull any punches.

It’s a sub-genre of fantasy where the line between good and evil gets as blurry as your vision after a Friday night at the pub.

Grimdark derives its name from the tagline of the tabletop game Warhammer 40,000: “In the grim darkness of the far future, there is only war.”

And in grimdark literature, there’s usually only war, torment, moral ambiguity, and buckets of blood.

Common Tropes: More Blood Than a Tarantino Film

Expect protagonists as cheerful as a goth at a beach party. These aren’t your heroic do-gooders with a heart of gold—they’re complex, flawed, and as likely to rob you as they are to save you.

They’ve got more in common with a seasoned convict than Prince Charming.

The settings are just as jolly.

Imagine if Mordor and the worse parts of Dickensian London had a baby—that’s your average grimdark world.

It’s bleak, it’s grimy, it’s brutal, and the chances of encountering a delightful enchanted forest are about as slim as finding a vegan at a steakhouse.

Themes and Characters: As Pleasant as a Root Canal

In a grimdark tale, don’t be surprised if your favourite character meets a grisly end.

The themes here tend to orbit around war, political intrigue, survival, and the darker side of humanity.

Characters are complex and exist in a moral grey area thicker than a London fog.

So, if you like your characters saintly and your endings happily-ever-after, this genre might give you more shocks than licking a battery.

But, if you’re intrigued by the depths of human depravity and how individuals navigate through a world as welcoming as a bed of nails, then grimdark could be your cup of tea’—dark and bitter.

How It Differs from Other Genres: Apples and Very Rotten Oranges

While traditional fantasy often revolves around a struggle between good and evil, grimdark plunges you into a world where those concepts are about as clear-cut as a Jackson Pollock painting.

Instead of lofty quests and noble heroes, grimdark stories focus on survival in a harsh world.

If epic fantasy is an inspiring orchestral symphony, grimdark is the guttural growl of a death metal band.

It’s raw, it’s intense, and it isn’t for the faint-hearted.

Where to Start Reading Grimdark Fantasy

Here are thirty-three formidable titles to cut your teeth on. Be warned: these aren’t your fluffy bedtime stories.

1. The First Law Trilogy by Joe Abercrombie

Abercrombie, fondly called Lord Grimdark, is the poster boy of this genre. His First Law Trilogy kicks off with ‘The Blade Itself,’ and its world is about as forgiving as a tax collector. Chock full of morally dubious characters, gratuitous violence, and a plot twistier than a pretzel, this series is a masterclass in grimdark.

2. Empires of Dust by Anna Smith Spark

Fancy poetry? Love a bit of the old ultra-violence? Then Anna Smith Spark’s Empires of Dust trilogy is your jam. The series starts with ‘Court of Broken Knives.’ Smith Spark’s style, a lyrical and visceral blend, mirrors the blend of beauty and brutality of the grimdark genre. Her characters are as ruthless as they come, so don’t expect to make any new friends here.

3. The Poppy War by R.F. Kuang

‘The Poppy War’ offers a grimdark tale drenched in historical and cultural richness. R.F. Kuang doesn’t shy away from depicting the raw brutality of war and its dehumanising effects. Here, the heroes make choices that will have you squirming in your seat. It’s as uplifting as a plummeting lift, but by God, it’s compelling.

4. War for the Rose Throne by Peter McLean

Starting with ‘Priest of Bones,’ Peter McLean’s series can be best described as Peaky Blinders with a grimdark twist. It’s filled with gang wars, political machinations, and a world as grim as a Monday morning. The writing is razor-sharp, and the characters are about as trustworthy as a three-pound note. It’s a grim ride, but worth every bloody moment.

5. The Malazan Book of the Fallen by Steven Erikson

This ten-book series is grimdark on an epic scale. With a complex plot, intricate world-building, and a character list longer than your arm, Erikson doesn’t ease up on the grimdark elements. It’s as light-hearted as a funeral in a downpour, but for those with the courage to take it on, it offers a reading experience like no other.

6. The Prince of Nothing series by R. Scott Bakker

Starting with ‘The Darkness That Comes Before,’ Bakker’s series is a philosophical deep-dive into a world that’s as friendly as a starving crocodile. The characters are complex, the philosophy is dense, and the world-building is as comprehensive as it gets. The Prince of Nothing series is perfect for readers who like their fantasy grim, their stakes high, and their themes heavy. It’s as cheery as a windowless cellar, but it’s an enthralling read nonetheless.

7. The Black Company by Glen Cook

Often credited as the grimdark progenitor, Glen Cook’s ‘The Black Company’ focuses on a mercenary company in a cynical, war-torn world. Expect plenty of morally grey characters, grim settings, and an all-round feeling of ‘we’re not in Kansas anymore’. It’s a series that smacks you in the face like a cold breeze, leaving you breathless and eager for more.

8. The Broken Empire Trilogy by Mark Lawrence

This series starts with ‘Prince of Thorns’, a book that introduces us to Jorg Ancrath, a protagonist as heartwarming as a kick in the shins. Lawrence’s narrative is as sharp as a well-honed blade, and his world is a place where hope goes to die. If you fancy a walk on the dark side with a character who wouldn’t know a moral compass if it bit him on the bum, give this trilogy a whirl.

9. The Nevernight Chronicles by Jay Kristoff

‘Nevernight,’ the first book in the series, presents us with Mia Corvere, a plucky young woman with a thirst for revenge and a shadowy talent for murder. She’s about as cuddly as a cactus, but you’ll find yourself rooting for her anyway. Kristoff’s grimdark saga is as dark as a pint of stout and as lethal as a viper’s bite. Strap in for a bumpy, bloody ride!

10. A Song of Ice and Fire by George R.R. Martin

This list wouldn’t be complete without mentioning George R.R. Martin’s epic series, starting with ‘A Game of Thrones’. Full of political intrigue, morally grey characters, and a level of unpredictability that makes Russian roulette look like a safe bet, this series is a must-read for grimdark enthusiasts. Just don’t get too attached to the characters; Martin is notorious for serving them up for dinner.

11. The Night Angel Trilogy by Brent Weeks

Starting with ‘The Way of Shadows,’ Brent Weeks presents a gripping tale of Azoth, a guild rat turned assassin. This trilogy is as cheerful as a tax audit, with moral ambiguity, dark magic, and a grimy underworld. Weeks paints a world steeped in shadows where life is cheap, and redemption comes with a high price. It’s a brutal, gritty ride that’s sure to satiate your grimdark cravings.

12. The Bone Ships series by RJ Barker

‘The Bone Ships’ sails into grimdark waters with a tale of ancient sea beasts, bone-made vessels, and a society that values death over life. Barker’s maritime world is as unwelcoming as a slap to the face, and his characters are hardened by a life of hardship and danger. If you’ve ever wondered what grimdark would look like on the high seas, this series is your answer.

13. The Steel Remains by Richard K. Morgan

Richard K. Morgan’s grimdark offering introduces us to Ringil Eskiath, a war hero with a biting wit and a preference for men. Expect a fair amount of brutality, cynicism, and the sort of banter that could make a sailor blush. It’s a dark, twisted journey that takes you through war, slavery, and betrayal. It’s as sweet as a vinegar smoothie, but its gripping narrative makes it a grimdark gem.

14. The Night Watch by Sergei Lukyanenko

Venturing into urban grimdark, ‘The Night Watch’ presents a modern-day Moscow teeming with supernatural beings. Lukyanenko’s world is as grim as a winter’s night, filled with vampires, witches, and shapeshifters living under a tense truce. It’s a thrilling, dark tale of power, conflict, and sacrifice that’ll have you wondering what lurks in the shadows of your own city.

15. A Crown for Cold Silver by Alex Marshall

The protagonist of ‘A Crown for Cold Silver’ is an ageing warrior who just wants to retire in peace but gets dragged back into the fray. It’s a tale of revenge filled with ruthless mercenaries, cruel demons, and political conspiracies. The world is as unforgiving as a hailstorm, and the characters are as warm as a winter’s morning. It’s a brutal, no-holds-barred ride into the grimdark genre.

16. Chronicles of the Unhewn Throne by Brian Staveley

Kicking off with ‘The Emperor’s Blades,’ Brian Staveley’s Chronicles of the Unhewn Throne is as light and fluffy as a lead balloon. The series presents a world on the brink of war, fraught with political intrigue, secret assassins, and divine powers. With complex characters and a multi-layered plot, it offers a delicious slice of grimdark pie.

17. The Vagrant by Peter Newman

Peter Newman’s ‘The Vagrant’ is a bit like Mad Max meets grimdark. In a post-apocalyptic world ravaged by demonic forces, the protagonist, a mute and nameless knight, travels towards a hopeful beacon carrying a legendary weapon and a baby. Newman’s desolate, war-torn landscape and his broken, desperate characters encapsulate the essence of grimdark.

18. The Chronicles of Thomas Covenant, the Unbeliever by Stephen R. Donaldson

This series, starting with ‘Lord Foul’s Bane,’ gives us Thomas Covenant, a leprosy-stricken writer transported to a magical realm where he’s destined to be the saviour. It’s a tale that delves into the darker aspects of the human psyche, shattering the boundaries between good and evil. With its flawed anti-hero and uncompromising narrative, this series is a grimdark classic.

19. The Farseer Trilogy by Robin Hobb

Robin Hobb’s Farseer Trilogy, beginning with ‘Assassin’s Apprentice,’ isn’t as relentlessly grim as some of the other titles on this list, but it’s got enough morally grey characters, political treachery, and brutal realism to earn a spot. It’s a beautifully written tale that delves into the cost of duty and the harsh realities of life. A grimdark offering that will tug at your heartstrings.

20. Beyond Redemption by Michael R. Fletcher

‘Beyond Redemption’ takes grimdark to a new level, exploring a world where insanity is power, and delusions can reshape reality. It’s a dark, unflinching story packed with flawed, deranged characters and a world as welcoming as a nest of vipers. Fletcher’s tale is a mind-bending descent into madness, epitomising the grimdark ethos.

21. Low Town by Daniel Polansky

In ‘Low Town,’ Polansky combines elements of grimdark fantasy with hard-boiled crime. The protagonist, known as the Warden, is a former investigator turned drug dealer navigating through a seedy underworld. It’s as uplifting as a rainy bank holiday, but its compelling mix of mystery, magic, and gritty realism makes for a compelling read.

22. Black Sun Rising by C.S. Friedman

‘Black Sun Rising’ marks the start of Friedman’s Coldfire Trilogy, a unique blend of science fiction and fantasy that’s as cheerful as a stubbed toe. Here, human fears and beliefs can manifest into reality, making for a dangerous, unforgiving world. The characters are a mix of morally ambiguous, complex individuals that fit right into the grimdark mould.

23. The Powder Mage Trilogy by Brian McClellan

The series begins with ‘Promise of Blood,’ and it’s a gunpowder-fuelled epic, teeming with political coups, ancient gods, and magic. McClellan’s world is grim and bloody, and his characters are far from the shining heroes of traditional fantasy. The Powder Mage trilogy is a fantastic entry point for those seeking a touch of the revolutionary in their grimdark reads.

24. The Grim Company by Luke Scull

With a title like ‘The Grim Company,’ you know what you’re getting yourself into. Scull delivers a world where the gods are dead, magic is dying, and humanity is not faring much better. It’s a tale of anti-heroes, dark magic, and a fight against oppressive forces. It’s grim by name and grim by nature, making it an excellent addition to your grimdark reading list.

25. The Gentleman Bastard Series by Scott Lynch

Starting with ‘The Lies of Locke Lamora,’ Lynch’s series is grimdark with a generous dose of wit. It’s a tale of con artists and thieves, set in a world rich with venetian-style intrigue and danger. It’s as light-hearted as a dentist appointment, but its blend of fast-paced plot, complex characters, and razor-sharp dialogue makes it a standout in the genre.

26. The Godblind Trilogy by Anna Stephens

Anna Stephens’s debut series, beginning with ‘Godblind,’ is about as cheerful as a funeral in the rain. With a religious war, morally ambiguous characters, and a truckload of brutality, Stephens takes us on a grimdark journey of epic proportions. It’s a relentless, blood-soaked series that pulls no punches, perfect for those who enjoy their fantasy dark and uncompromising.

27. The Acacia Series by David Anthony Durham

Kicking off with ‘Acacia: The War with the Mein,’ Durham’s series presents a story of political intrigue, war, and betrayal in a world as warm and welcoming as a bear trap. It’s a sweeping tale of power, ambition, and the cost of empire. The Acacia series is a grimdark journey with a touch of epic fantasy that will leave you pondering the grey areas of morality.

28. Chronicles of the Exile by Marc Turner

Marc Turner’s series, starting with ‘When the Heavens Fall,’ provides a grand saga of dark gods, magical artefacts, and a host of characters who’d probably rob their own grandmothers. With its complex plot, morally grey characters, and world steeped in darkness, this series is a grimdark feast for fans of high stakes and epic conflicts.

29. The Five Warrior Angels by Brian Lee Durfee

The series begins with ‘The Forgetting Moon,’ where Durfee serves a banquet of battle-hardened warriors, ancient prophecies, and looming apocalypse. It’s a story of war and destiny, where hope seems as distant as a summer’s day in a British winter. Its harsh world, complex characters, and intricate plot make it a fantastic entry to the grimdark genre.

30. The Worldbreaker Saga by Kameron Hurley

Starting with ‘The Mirror Empire,’ Hurley’s saga plunges us into a world where star-powered magic, sentient plants, and parallel universes are the norm. It’s as comforting as a bed of nails, exploring themes of power, identity, and survival in a world on the brink of annihilation. If you want your grimdark served with a side of originality, The Worldbreaker Saga is just the ticket.

31. The Grimnir Series by Scott Oden

Scott Oden takes us on a bloody romp through a Viking-inspired world in the Grimnir series, starting with ‘A Gathering of Ravens.’ It’s a tale of revenge, filled with brutal battles, ancient magic, and a protagonist who’s as cuddly as a cactus. Oden’s world is harsh and unforgiving, and his characters are as morally grey as they come. It’s a fantastic blend of historical fiction and grimdark fantasy that will leave you thirsting for more.

32. The Grey Bastards by Jonathan French

Jonathan French’s ‘The Grey Bastards’ is a wonderfully filthy dive into a world of half-orcs, treacherous humans, and deadly magic. It’s grimdark with a dash of grit and a generous helping of dark humour. The characters are rough, ready, and morally ambiguous, making it a standout entry in the grimdark genre. It’s a wild, raucous ride that isn’t for the faint-hearted, but if you can handle the grime, it’s well worth the journey.

33. The Coming of Conan the Cimmerian by Robert E. Howard

Although it predates the term ‘grimdark,’ Robert E. Howard’s Conan series, starting with ‘The Coming of Conan the Cimmerian,’ embodies many of the genre’s defining characteristics. Conan’s world is a savage, brutal place filled with dark magic and deadly creatures. The protagonist himself is a far cry from your typical hero, embodying a ruthless, take-no-prisoners approach to life. It’s a foundational work for the grimdark genre, demonstrating that even in fantasy, the world can be a dark, dangerous place.

Honorary Mention: The Horus Heresy Series in the Warhammer 40,000 Universe

Last but definitely not least, let’s delve into the grimdark depths of the Warhammer 40,000 universe with the Horus Heresy series.

This sprawling saga is a monumental piece of grimdark fiction.

Taking us to the 31st millennium, the series explores the galaxy-spanning civil war that nearly tore the imperium of man apart.

The Horus Heresy, spearheaded by the emperor’s favoured son, Horus, pits brother against brother in a devastating conflict.

From the lofty heights of the Imperial Palace to the bloody battlefields of a thousand worlds, no one is safe from the horrors of war.

In true grimdark fashion, the Horus Heresy is a tale of betrayal, of once-noble heroes falling to corruption, and the devastating price of ambition and power.

It offers a grim vision of the future where there is only war and the laughter of thirsting gods.

The series, with contributions from various authors, is a grimdark feast for fans of war-torn galaxies, morally ambiguous characters, and high-stakes battles.

Be warned, though—once you start, you’ll find yourself on a journey as vast and dark as the Warhammer 40k universe itself.

Grimdark fantasy is a journey that’s not for everyone. It’s like Marmite—you either love it, or it gives you nightmares.

But if you can stomach the grit and grime, if you can handle the moral ambiguity and the despair, you’ll find a genre that isn’t afraid to take risks, to defy expectations, and to show the world in all its brutal, messy glory.

So take a deep breath, grab one of these books, and step into the shadows. Who knows? You might find that you like the dark.

So there you have it, a quick and dirty introduction to the world of grimdark fantasy. It’s a genre that pulls no punches and isn’t afraid to show you the world in all its murky shades of grey. But remember, it’s not all doom and gloom’—there’s plenty of dark humour, thrilling action, and captivating stories. Dive in, and who knows? You might find that you enjoy exploring the shadows.

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